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Please understand that this website is not affiliated with any of the perfume companies written about here in any way, it is only a reference page for collectors and those who have enjoyed the classic fragrances of days gone by.

One of the goals of this website is to show the present owners of the various perfumes and cologne brands that are featured here how much we miss the discontinued classics and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back these fragrances!

Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the fragrance, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories, what it reminded you of, maybe a relative wore it, or you remembered seeing the bottle on their vanity table), who knows, perhaps someone from the company brand might see it.

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Tuesday, August 8, 2017

PERFUME HACK - Removing Perfume Stains

Did you spill perfume or cologne on your favorite dress or did your cat knock over your best bottle of perfume onto the carpet? Here are some quick and easy tips to remove those stains!

From Fabrics:


Helpful Tip: Treat stains as soon as possible after staining. The older the stain, the more difficult it will be to remove. Perfumes often contain both alcohol and oils, as well as dyes, any of which can leave a stain. All stain removal methods should be applied prior to laundering washable garments. Stains that have been laundered and dried are almost impossible to remove. Always test a cleaning solution on a small, out-of-the-way area first to look for any adverse reaction.

Caution: Never mix chlorine bleach with ammonia - fumes are hazardous.


For Washable Fabrics:

What you will need

  • Liquid hand dishwashing detergent
  • White vinegar
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Enzyme presoak product
  • Chlorine bleach or oxygen bleach


Steps to Clean:

  1. Soak for 15 minutes in mixture of one quart lukewarm water, one-half teaspoon liquid hand dishwashing detergent and one tablespoon white vinegar. Rinse.
  2. Sponge with rubbing alcohol, using light motions from center to edge of stain.
  3. Soak for 30 minutes in one quart warm water with one tablespoon enzyme presoak products.
  4. If color stain remains, launder in chlorine bleach if safe for the fabric, or in oxygen bleach.

Carpet:



What you will need:
  • White vinegar
  • Detergent
  • 3% Hydrogen peroxide


Steps to Clean:
  1. Blot with a white paper towel to remove as much of the stain as possible, then neutralize with a white vinegar solution (1/3 cup WHITE vinegar in 2/3 cup of water). Saturate spot with white vinegar solution, using a spray bottle and blot to remove excess moisture.
  2. Apply a small quantity of detergent solution to the spot. (To make the detergent solution mix 1/4 teaspoon of a hand dishwashing detergent which does not contain lanolin or bleach with 1 quart of water) Use a blotting motion to work the detergent into the affected area. If spot is being removed continue applying detergent and blotting with a white paper towel until spot is removed.
  3. Rinse with tap water using a spray bottle, blot to remove excess moisture.
  4. Spray lightly with water, do not blot this time; apply pad of paper towels and brick and allow to dry.
  5. If there is still some stain on the carpet and blotting is not removing it, then moisten the tufts in the stained area with 3% hydrogen peroxide. Let stand for on (1) hour. Blot and repeat until carpet is stain free. Light will cause peroxide to change back to water so no rinsing is necessary. Apply pad of paper towels and weight down with brick.
Or

What you will need
  • Detergent
  • White vinegar

Steps to Clean:
  1. Using clean white paper towels, blot up as much of the stain as possible.
  2. Use plain water or mix one tablespoon of liquid dishwashing detergent and one tablespoon of white vinegar with two cups of warm water.
  3. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with a small amount of water or the detergent/vinegar solution. Apply a little bit at a time, blotting frequently with a dry cloth until the stain disappears.
  4. If using a detergent/vinegar solution, sponge with cold water and blot dry to remove the solution.


Upholstery:

What you will need:
  • Dry cleaning solvent

Steps to Clean:
  1. Using a clean white cloth, sponge the stain with the dry cleaning solvent.
  2. Blot until the solvent is absorbed.
  3. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until the stain disappears.


Other Surfaces:


Removing Perfume Stains From Wood:

  • To remove perfume stains from the wooden top of your vanity table, rub a little olive oil over the spots. Then rub with a fresh, soft cloth to remove excess oil. 

Removing Perfume from Ceramic Tile:
  • Step 1: Blot the perfume spill with paper towels or absorbent rags to remove most of the liquid. Do not wipe the perfume, which may spread oil and fragrance beyond the affected area.
  • Step 2: Pour baking soda over the spill area. Allow the baking soda to absorb the liquid and oil from the perfume for five to ten minutes. Sweep it up with a broom and dustpan. Apply more baking soda to the perfume spill until the baking soda no longer wicks up any liquid or oil. Remove the last application of baking soda from the ceramic tile using your broom and dustpan.
  • Step 3: Fill a bucket with warm water and add one teaspoon of liquid dishwashing detergent. Stir the soapy solution with your hands to mix.
  • Step 4: Saturate a clean cloth with the soapy solution. Wipe the ceramic tile at the site of the spill. The dishwashing detergent will remove any remaining oils from the perfume. Dampen a clean cloth with water and rinse the tile. - info from Hunker.com



Some info suggested by the University of Illinois.

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