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Vintage Perfumes For Sale

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Wrisley Perfumes

Allen B. Wrisley of 6801 W. 65th St. Chicago; launched a range of fragrances; also had a branch in New York. Wrisley sold toiletries, like soaps, colognes, bath tablets, bath crystals, face creams, tooth powders, dusting powders and perfumes.





Allen B. Wrisley Company of 477-485 Fifth Ave, Chicago.

 Established 1862. Incorporated 1895.

  • Allen B Wrisley, President 
  • Myron M Drury, Vice President and Treasurer 
  • Richard B Oleson, Secretary 
  • George F Merrill, General Manager of Perfume Department 



 Wrisley Perfumes:

  • 1887 Alpine Rose 
  • 1887 Carnation Pink 
  • 1887 Ess Bouquet 
  • 1887 Fleur de Alba 
  • 1887 Florentine Bouquet 
  • 1887 Flowers of Italy 
  • 1887 Jockey Club 
  • 1887 Lily of the Valley 
  • 1887 Musk 
  • 1887 New Mown Hay 
  • 1887 Patchouly 
  • 1887 Roman Bouquet 
  • 1887 Rose Geranium 
  • 1887 Santa Lang 
  • 1887 Stephanotis 
  • 1887 Violet 
  • 1887 West End 
  • 1887 White Rose 
  • 1887 Ylang Ylang 
  • 1895 Colonial, reintroduced in 1901, and again in the 1940s
  • 1900 Peau d'Espagne
  • 1903 Sandalwood
  • 1903 Ambrosia
  • 1903 Colonial Dame
  • 1903 Florentine
  • 1903 Aria
  • 1903 Flowers of America
  • 1903 Flowers of Italy
  • 1903 Gypsy Pink
  • 1903 India Violet
  • 1903 Lorelei Bouquet
  • 1903 Florentine Rose
  • 1903 Florentine White Rose
  • 1903 Lorelei Cologne
  • 1903 Gypsy Rose
  • 1903 Marie Antoinette
  • 1903 Vicereine Rose
  • 1903 Vicereine Violet
  • 1903 White Alpine Rose
  • 1903 Alpine Violet
  • 1908 Gold Fire
  • 1908 Magnolia Bloom
  • 1908 Princess
  • 1908 Queen
  • 1908 Regal
  • 1908 Royal
  • 1908 San Toy
  • 1910 Wildwood
  • 1912 Mione
  • 1918 Trailing Arbutus
  • 1918 Jasmine
  • 1922 Wistaria
  • 1922 English Lilac
  • 1922 English Lavender
  • 1922 Rose Pom Pom
  • 1922 Wild Crab Apple Blossom
  • 1926 Narcissus
  • 1926 Lilac Bouquet
  • 1935 Rose
  • 1935 Pine
  • 1936 Fez
  • 1936 Queen's Guard
  • 1936 Gardenia
  • 1936 Lilac
  • 1936 Violet
  • 1936 Lavender
  • 1936 Siberian Pine
  • 1939 Gaiety, reintroduced in 1962
  • 1940 Apple Blossom
  • 1940 Hobnail Cologne
  • 1940 Carnation
  • 1940 Spring Garden
  • 1941 Pink Coral
  • 1941 White Flower Cologne
  • 1941 Blue Fern
  • 1941 Gold Tassel
  • 1942 Apothecary
  • 1942 Old Fashioned Bouquet
  • 1942 Scentiments
  • 1942 Wild Flower Cologne
  • 1943 Frill Cologne
  • 1943 Beau Rose
  • 1944 Reservation For Two
  • 1945 Spruce
  • 1948 Ambrosia, reintroduced
  • 1950 Saddle Club
  • 1951 My Heart, reintroduced in 1960
  • 1958 Flore
  • 1958 Golden Rose
  • 1958 Blue Vlevet
  • 1958 Pink Mink
  • 1961 Magnetique
  • French Lilac
  • Honeysuckle
  • Martha Washington


Ad from 1903:


Ads from 1941









Ads from 1953









2 comments:

  1. My father was an accountant for Allen B Wrisley in Chicago for many years. He died in 1953 and I remember probably about a year before he died they had a contest to name a new soap. I don't know who won the contest, but the name they chose was Sure X. My step mother used all of their products and I recognize many of them on this page. webshultz@hotmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. My father was a package designer at Wrisley in the 1940's until probably 1954, when my parents moved to California. His name was Oliver Flower and in Los Angeles, he went to work at Max Factor where he stayed for 30 years. He was only the second packaging designer they had ever had, replacing the original designer, a woman, who had been there from the beginning.

    ReplyDelete

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